Doyle HawksEUGENE: “It was a wonderful place to live,” Billie Ruth Rose had to say about the community of logger’s families that once thrived near Quartz Creek on the McKenzie River. “My folks lived there for 20 years. There were probably 100 kids in the area and the mothers mainly stayed home to raise families. It was a good place - like Mayberry without Barney and Andy.”
Rose and Doyle Hawks, also a fellow kid from “Arkyville,” as the camp was called locally, were featured last weekend at the McKenzie Memories presentation in Eugene. Hawks shared some of the history about how the settlement came to be - tracing founder “Whit” Rosborough’s migration from the pine woods of Arkansas and the contingent of workers who followed him when he reestablished his mills in Oregon.
“I grew up with a fishing rod in one hand and a rifle in the other,” Hawks recalled. But he and other boys in the neighborhood had their hands on some tools. Most started working in the woods when they were in the 9th grade, and kept at it until they graduated - planting trees for Rosboro for a dollar an hour.

Goose ProjectA document outlining plans for the Goose Project has been released by the Willamette National Forest. The draft record of decision and final environmental impact statement affects 17,932 acres along Highways 126 and 242, near the community of McKenzie Bridge.
District Ranger Terry Baker noted the Goose project was designed to provide a sustainable supply of timber products, reduce hazardous fuels, and “Actively manage stands to improve stand conditions, diversity, density, and structure.”





Tillamook BurnBy Finn J.D. John
The morning of August 14, 1933, was a morning to break a gyppo logger’s heart.

Loading logsIn 2013, Oregon’s timber harvest rose to 4.2 billion board feet, marking four consecutive years of increase from the recession low of 2.72 billion board feet in 2009.

Process turns cellulose into energy storage devices

Tree harvest

BLM meetingLEABURG: Area residents had a chance to hear about the Bureau of Land Management’s plans for logging near Vida at a public meeting last Thursday. Agency staffers with backgrounds ranging from fish biologists to silviculurists explained some of the reasoning for tree removal on up to 2,000 acres on both sides of the McKenzie River.
How that might impact the local community was a concern for many of the people in the room.

Vida logging mapLEABURG: The Bureau of Land Management will host a meeting on Thursday to review possible logging near Vida. Up for discussion will be up to 2,060 acres in the McKenzie Landscape Project area.
According to BLM staffers, in 1994 the Northwest Forest Plan established adaptive management areas (AMAs) to test new methods of achieving resource and conservation goals.


McKenzie River Reflections is the weekly newspaper serving Oregon's McKenzie River Valley. Available by mail for $23/yr in Lane County, $29/yr outside Lane. Digital subscriptions are $23/yr. Subscribe at: http://mckenzieriverreflectionsnewspaper.com/catalog/subscriptions-0. Purchase copies online at: http://mckenzieriverreflectionsnewspaper.com/catalog/back-issues-0. Read about area communities including Cedar Flat, Walterville, Camp Creek, Leaburg, Vida, Nimrod, Finn Rock, Blue River, Rainbow and McKenzie Bridge.