McKenzie River Reflections

Jesus savesBLUE RIVER: Randy Boehmer says “Oregon is the 26th state these mules have pulled these wagons.” Averaging three to four miles an hour to a bale of hay, the Arizona native has been on the road for eight years. “I am out here living a slower paced life trusting God that people will see the Bible verses on the sides of the wagons, believe that Jesus is the one true living God, repent of their sins and ask Jesus into their hearts. There are no diesel trucks and horse trailers following us - it’s just the 9 of us - 5 mules, 2 dogs, Jesus, and me.”
His sheepherder’s wagon was eastbound on the McKenzie Highway this week, after an excursion covering 200 miles of the Oregon coast since the Fall.

A taxidermist for 40 years, Boehmer began to look at life differently when his parents died in 1991. Helping his siblings clean out their belongings caused him to realize all they’d worked for so hard meant little when most of their possessions were carted off to the dump.

 

 

New powderGet ready to spring forward this weekend with fresh powder and fun times at Hoodoo. The current forecast is predicting 24-42 inches of new snow Friday night through Monday. It's the perfect time to visit Hoodoo and enjoy some late winter turns on the slopes.
National Weather Service
Detailed Forecast
This Afternoon - Rain before 4pm, then rain and snow showers. High near 38. South southeast wind 5 to 7 mph becoming light and variable. Chance of precipitation is 100%. Little or no snow accumulation expected.
Tonight - Rain and snow. Low around 30. Southwest wind 10 to 16 mph, with gusts as high as 24 mph. Chance of precipitation is 80%. New snow accumulation of around an inch possible.
Saturday - Snow. High near 36. Southwest wind around 18 mph, with gusts as high as 26 mph. Chance of precipitation is 100%. New snow accumulation of 3 to 7 inches possible.

Internet worldBroadband access on the agenda next week

LEABURG: Narrowing the digital divide that separates rural areas from high speed internet connections will be the focus of a March 17th meeting at McKenzie Fire & Rescue’s Leaburg Training Center. Organizers of the meeting include several McKenzie area residents who attended a Rural Broadband Conference convened by the Oregon Rural Development Council in Bend last month. That conference offered information on an array of federal, state and local initiatives that were designed to reach unserved, and under-served rural residents.

OnionsBy Kym Pokorny

Get onions in the ground in spring and avoid heartbreak when it comes time to harvest big, beautiful bulbs this summer.

Plant as soon as the soil is dry enough to work, said Jim Myers, a plant breeder at Oregon State University. March and April are prime times.

Most onions grown in Oregon are long-day onions. They make top, green growth until a critical day length is reached, which triggers bulbing. That generally begins at about 14 hours of light per day.

If you plant onions in early spring, they’ll grow to fairly large plants by the time daylight reaches 14 hours. Large bulbs result. However, if you wait to plant until the end of April when days are already 14 hours long, bulbing will begin immediately and you’ll have small pearl onions.

Steelhead releasedIt takes just one generation for the DNA of steelhead domesticated in hatcheries to be altered and to be significantly different than steelhead whose parents are wild, according to a recent study by Oregon State University.
In fact the study found that in just one generation there were 723 genes that differed between the offspring of wild steelhead and the offspring of first-generation hatchery steelhead.
Further, the study found through gene enrichment analysis that adapting to the hatchery environment involves responses by the steelhead in wound healing, immunity and metabolism, suggesting the adaptation is due to crowding in hatcheries.
“We found hundreds of genes were   expressed   differently   between the offspring of first-generation hatchery fish and the offspring of wild fish, and that the difference was heritable from their parents,” said lead researcher Michael Blouin, professor in the Department of Integrative Biology at OSU.

Feb. 24: 3:30 pm: Suspicious Conditions – 90000 block, Greenwood Dr. Someone approached complainant & advised he was fishing at the boat landing. A vehicle there hasn’t moved for 2 hours, with a wheelchair sticking out of it & an open door. It appears subject is camping at the location. They approached the vehicle & saw a male in a sleeping bag. He didn’t seem to be moving. Involved vehicle is a green Subaru. 15:32: Fire Dept. confirmed the male was sleeping.

Eagle Rock ParkEUGENE: The Lane County Parks Advisory Committee will hold a public hearing in two weeks to gather testimony regarding the draft Five-Year Capital Improvement Program (CIP) for county parks projects from 2017 to 2021.
The Parks CIP is a five-year program used to plan expenditures for capital improvements to the Lane County Parks System according to Parks Manager Mike Russell. “Projects included in the CIP are designed to improve safety, utility and efficiency of existing facilities and further develop and add amenities that will improve visitors’ experiences,” he said. “Community members who have a park project that they would like to see included in the plan are encouraged to attend the hearing and provide testimony.”

Blue River mapBy Jim Baker, Blue River CDC & McKenzie Action team
The McKenzie Action Team, a group of community volunteers, hosted an open session on February 17 for residents to gather and discuss options for dealing with septic tank issues in Blue River.
There has been a long festering problem with aging and failing septic tanks. In addition, the small lots in Blue River do not meet modern standards for building due to septic requirements.
As a result, many of the business properties in Blue River cannot reopen or expand. Building lots stay vacant and a home owner often can’t even add a bedroom to their own home for they’re growing family.

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McKenzie River Reflections is the weekly newspaper serving Oregon's McKenzie River Valley. Available by mail for $23/yr in Lane County, $29/yr outside Lane. Digital subscriptions are $23/yr. Subscribe at: http://mckenzieriverreflectionsnewspaper.com/catalog/subscriptions-0. Purchase copies online at: http://mckenzieriverreflectionsnewspaper.com/catalog/back-issues-0. Read about area communities including Cedar Flat, Walterville, Camp Creek, Leaburg, Vida, Nimrod, Finn Rock, Blue River, Rainbow and McKenzie Bridge.