OSU Extension Service

Plant gallsBy Peg Herring
Oregon State University plans to use a $3 million grant to study two groups of bacteria that result in millions of dollars in losses annually to the nation’s nursery industry.
Researchers will study Agrobacterium tumefaciens and Rhodococcus fascians, which deform hundreds of common landscape plants, including hostas, Shasta daisies, petunias and pansies.

TulipsBy Kym Pokorny

Paperwhite narcissus bulbs, because of their fragrance, are popular to grow in pots indoors, but nearly all bulbs sold in the fall work well in pots that stay outdoors. “It’s easy to create a stunning display that begins to grow in the fall or middle of winter, then bursts into bloom in the spring or early summer,” said Heather Stoven, Oregon State University Extension horticulturist. “In fact, if you choose the right plants, you can create a bulb display that extends through the seasons.

Cherry DropsBy Kym Pokorny

Once a week from June 14 to mid-September, Harry Olson and Tobie Habeck commuted from Salem to Silverton to tend a U-shaped plot at The Oregon Garden. As they weeded and watered, the duo would hear docents tell their trams full of visitors about the little-known grafted vegetables overflowing from the raised beds and spilling onto the mulched aisles.

salad greensBy Kym Pokorny
October is a perfect time to sow salad greens for harvest throughout the fall and winter months.
"If you live in the warmer, wetter regions of the state, you can plant lettuce and other greens now," said Oregon State University vegetable breeder Jim Myers. "In the colder areas of the state, a cold frame or cloche can help lengthen the harvest season into winter."
If you harvest through the winter, protect your greens from late fall and winter downpours. Leafy greens tend to rot.

HebesBy Daniel Robison
If you like to prolong color in your landscapes through the summer and into the fall, consider planting evergreen shrubs called Hebes (pronounced HEE-bees) for vivid color in both flowers and foliage during summer and fall.
“Most Hebes flower in the summer, but others bloom in late fall,” said Neil Bell, consumer horticulturalist with the Oregon State University Extension Service.

DeadheadingBy Tiffany Woods
Deadheading is a gardening chore that many people find pleasant – by pinching off fading flowers, you can beautify your landscape and keep some plants blooming longer. But is it necessary?

WateringBy Tiffany Woods
Ross Penhallegon, a horticulturist with the Oregon State University Extension Service, recommends watering during the early morning hours. That's because there is usually less wind to affect the soaker hose, drip or sprinkler pattern. Plus, the temperatures are lower in the early morning, meaning more water gets into the soil and doesn't evaporate.

 

Sweet cornBy Denise Ruttan
Could your spotless peppers or flawless flowers have what it takes to claim the blue ribbon at your local or county fair this summer?
With some insider tips from Lynn Long, you could make this your year to test their mettle. Long, a horticulturalist for the Oregon State University Extension Service and county leader for the OSU Extension Service in Wasco County, previously served as a judge at the Wasco County Fair and Rodeo for several years.

HoneybeeBy Denise Ruttan
Consider adding some flower power to your landscape to bring in the buzz of pollinators to your garden.  
"Floral abundance is one of the strongest ways to promote bee diversity in gardens," said Gail Langellotto, the statewide coordinator for the Oregon State University Extension Service's Master Gardener program.

Big pumpkinBy Denise Ruttan
Halloween may be months away but if you are hoping to grow monster pumpkins, now is the time to start planting.
The world record monster pumpkin of 2013 weighed in at 2,032 pounds, according to the New York Botanical Garden.

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McKenzie River Reflections is the weekly newspaper serving Oregon's McKenzie River Valley. Available by mail for $23/yr in Lane County, $29/yr outside Lane. Digital subscriptions are $23/yr. Subscribe at: http://mckenzieriverreflectionsnewspaper.com/catalog/subscriptions-0. Purchase copies online at: http://mckenzieriverreflectionsnewspaper.com/catalog/back-issues-0. Read about area communities including Cedar Flat, Walterville, Camp Creek, Leaburg, Vida, Nimrod, Finn Rock, Blue River, Rainbow and McKenzie Bridge.