Recreation

Summer forecasts are very low

Steelhead release

 

 

 

 

 

 

Facing some of the lowest steelhead returns on record, the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife has already curtailed steelhead fishing seasons throughout the Columbia River basin by adopting rolling season closures, reduced bag limits, and a night angling closure for all species.
Additionally, ODFW is asking anglers to further help the region’s steelhead by taking more care when the fish are out of the water.
“Positive voluntary efforts may reduce the necessity for future mandatory regulations,” said Tucker Jones, ODFW’s manager of Ocean Salmon and Columbia River fisheries. “If a person happens to intercept a wild steelhead, or any steelhead during a retention closure period for that matter, it is imperative that they do their utmost to ensure its survival by using best handling practices.”

McKenzie River Guides have cooperated for 85 years

3 Guides

EUGENE: At the turn of the last century a handful of hearty oarsmen began offering a new service  - fishing from a boat. Anglers attracted to the McKenzie River soon discovered that was a good idea. Not only could they avoid getting their lines caught in stream bank brush but a boat could maneuver closer to pools and eddies previously out of reach.
Since those early days the boats, access points to the water and equipment all have changed, but not the attitude of the people manning the oars. Three of them gave some insights into how professional guiding developed when they spoke as part of the McKenzie Memories program.
Some changes came about when the roads themselves began to improve beyond a muddy path. That allowed guides to trailer their boats further upstream and fish longer stretches of the river, according to Dana Burwell. That in itself would still be quite a chore since the early board and batten board boats the guides built themselves weighed between 500 to 600 pounds. Moving them involved hitching up a horse and wagon with a trailer behind.

The McKenzie River Ranger District, Willamette National Forest has prepared a draft Decision Memos for the Tamolitch Pools Bike Bypass Trail Project.  The proposed action will create a bike specific trail that segregates hiking and biking traffic along the busiest section of the McKenzie River National Recreation Trail (Tr. No. 3507), from the Blue Pool Trailhead to the Blue Pool (Tamolitch falls).  The proposed project is located on the McKenzie River Ranger District, Willamette National Forest at the following Township/Range’s:   T14S, R7E Sec.

Riverine environment

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Proposed McKenzie River Interpretive Center

Info Center entrance

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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McKenzie River Reflections is the weekly newspaper serving Oregon's McKenzie River Valley. Available by mail for $23/yr in Lane County, $29/yr outside Lane. Digital subscriptions are $23/yr. Subscribe at: http://mckenzieriverreflectionsnewspaper.com/catalog/subscriptions-0. Purchase copies online at: http://mckenzieriverreflectionsnewspaper.com/catalog/back-issues-0. Read about area communities including Cedar Flat, Walterville, Camp Creek, Leaburg, Vida, Nimrod, Finn Rock, Blue River, Rainbow and McKenzie Bridge.