US Forest Service

Fire dangerLightning-caused wildfires have burned more than 50,000 acres of forest in southern Oregon. While the Oregon Department of Forestry’s (ODF) Western Lane and South Cascade districts escaped most of the thunderstorm activity, the districts are concerned about another source of fire starts: people.

Trash in forestPhoto Courtesy USFS
Trash piles in the woods are causing officials to consider clamping down on areas where dispersed camping will be allowed.

MCKENZIE BRIDGE: Due to on-going damage to natural resources, the McKenzie River Ranger District is proposing expanding the camping restrictions near Cougar Reservoir and adding a new camping restriction adjacent to the lower McKenzie River National Recreation Trail. Officials say that in these locations, long-term campers have left large accumulations of garbage, food items, hazardous substances, improperly disposed of fecal waste, and damaged vegetation and soils. The new regulations would also prohibit campfires in these areas.

Several closures lifted or reduced

Forest Road 1910

The hard work of fire crews to improve containment of the Buckhead Complex fires has enabled fire managers to lift or reduce several closures on the forest. Effective today (August 24) the closures for North Fork Trail, Forest Road 1910 and the Waldo Lake area closure (which included the Pacific Crest Trail) have been lifted and the areas are now open to public access.

McKenzie River Reflections is the weekly newspaper serving Oregon's McKenzie River Valley. Available by mail for $23/yr in Lane County, $29/yr outside Lane. Digital subscriptions are $23/yr. Subscribe at: http://mckenzieriverreflectionsnewspaper.com/catalog/subscriptions-0. Purchase copies online at: http://mckenzieriverreflectionsnewspaper.com/catalog/back-issues-0. Read about area communities including Cedar Flat, Walterville, Camp Creek, Leaburg, Vida, Nimrod, Finn Rock, Blue River, Rainbow and McKenzie Bridge.