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Master Plan up for review in Leaburg Thursday night

LEABURG: The Parks Division is asking the public’s opinions on how to manage 70 different properties scattered throughout Lane County. A number of public workshops on the 20-year kicked off this week, including one  at McKenzie Fire & Rescue’s  Leaburg Training Center on Thursday night.
Public input submitted so far included comments about a number of McKenzie River area sites, like the Hendricks Bridge Park in Walterville. One note from Lynn Moore cited concerns of neighbors who worry that adding an RV slots there would increase and traffic impact safety. “We will have more accidents, crime, and we do not want this park to become a campground,” she wrote.  

McKenzie River Guides have cooperated for 85 years

3 Guides

EUGENE: At the turn of the last century a handful of hearty oarsmen began offering a new service  - fishing from a boat. Anglers attracted to the McKenzie River soon discovered that was a good idea. Not only could they avoid getting their lines caught in stream bank brush but a boat could maneuver closer to pools and eddies previously out of reach.
Since those early days the boats, access points to the water and equipment all have changed, but not the attitude of the people manning the oars. Three of them gave some insights into how professional guiding developed when they spoke as part of the McKenzie Memories program.
Some changes came about when the roads themselves began to improve beyond a muddy path. That allowed guides to trailer their boats further upstream and fish longer stretches of the river, according to Dana Burwell. That in itself would still be quite a chore since the early board and batten board boats the guides built themselves weighed between 500 to 600 pounds. Moving them involved hitching up a horse and wagon with a trailer behind.

4th annual program will highlight tourist industry’s base

Log Cabin Guides
EUGENE: This year’s McKenzie Memories event will celebrate the history of the River with storytelling, rare historic photos, artifacts, and more. This year’s program ranges from a picture view of historic McKenzie River lodges like the Log Cabin Inn and the lodge at Foley Hot Springs to local storytellers Steve Schaefers, Don Wouda, and Dana Burwell from the McKenzie River Guides Association, founded in 1931.
People attending the event can expect to hear stories about what life was like as a guide in the early 1900s and the guides’ key role in conservation and stewardship of the McKenzie River.

170-foot setback will impact all Lane streambank properties

Flood

Flood insurance or fish? Officials of counties, cities and other municipalities around Oregon had that question put on their platters in April. That’s when a lawsuit by environmental groups generated recommendations from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration outlining ways the Federal Emergency Management Agency should modify the National Flood Insurance Program. Throughout the state, 15 salmon and steelhead species are listed under an Environmental Impact Statement. Each, according to NOAA Fisheries, depends on a healthy, functioning floodplain habitat.

New book about Camp Creek community to print soon

Small log truck

CAMP CREEK: Compiling a hundred years of local history has been a task Susan Thomas hopes to wrap up soon. “This whole project,” she recalls, “goes back to 1999 when I was teaching at Camp Creek Elementary, preparing for the school’s 50th anniversary. I started talking to a lot of people and visited with community member Betty Miller.”
Miller, Susan learned, had always wanted to put together some kind of community book that would include some of the photos and facts she’d already compiled. Struck by Susan’s enthusiasm, she passed it on to her.

Ron TompkinsWALTERVILLE: Like many of his generation, Ron Tompkins answered the call to arms for the armed services in World War II. Age for him wasn’t an issue, getting his mother to sign off on his enlistment papers when he was nine months shy of his 18th birthday.
Time, however, did have an effect. Coming into the Navy in 1945 he sailed out of San Francisco and arrived for duty in the Philippines. In the Marshall Islands his ship, the USS Petrof Bay, a 7,800 ton aircraft carrier, was part of a fleet being put together for the invasion of Japan. Those plans came to a halt soon after the sailors saw a strange bomber fly over their ship escorted by two fighters.
Ron says that at the time, they had no idea of the significance of what they’d seen, only remembering that the heavy bomber had what looked like a “big torpedo” slung underneath. Another clue that made sense later was chatter on the radio at the time telling people to expect some weird weather.

Vida Cafe reopenBy Walter Wilson
VIDA: It’s been almost a year since the Vida Cafe went up in flames in the early morning hours on October 24th in 2015. The valley had lost another icon. But owner Sue Nelson said, “We’ll rebuild and hopefully we’ll be back in business real soon.”
And so the process began. It was an uphill battle, but after just over a year the reopening announcement spread through the community like wild fire. People were calling each other, emails, Facebook, and social media were all buzzing with the news, the Vida Cafe would reopen on Monday, November 7th at 7 a.m.

SchaefersVIDA: Efforts to create a new McKenzie River Interpretive Center moved forward last week during two workshops held at the Wayfarer Resort. The two-day planning sessions were part of a process dating back to 2007 when members of the McKenzie River Guides Association presented a proposal for a “Museum of the McKenzie River” to the Lane County Parks Advisory Committee.
Details of the concept called for the creation of a facility on the grounds of the Old McKenzie Fish Hatchery that would present the history behind  the development of the McKenzie River drift boat, as well as unique aspects of the area’s geology and fisheries.
Recent  developments have  included the completion of a feasibility  and  marketing  study  conducted  by the  University of Oregon’s Community Planning Workshop that supported the Interpretive Center plan by comparing it to six other similar sites in the Pacific Northwest.

 

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McKenzie River Reflections is the weekly newspaper serving Oregon's McKenzie River Valley. Available by mail for $23/yr in Lane County, $29/yr outside Lane. Digital subscriptions are $23/yr. Subscribe at: http://mckenzieriverreflectionsnewspaper.com/catalog/subscriptions-0. Purchase copies online at: http://mckenzieriverreflectionsnewspaper.com/catalog/back-issues-0. Read about area communities including Cedar Flat, Walterville, Camp Creek, Leaburg, Vida, Nimrod, Finn Rock, Blue River, Rainbow and McKenzie Bridge.