Whats New

Flying toiletModular restroom swings into Hendricks Wayside

WALTERVILLE: Passersby may have been surprised last week if they noticed a big crane set up in the parking area at the Hendricks Bridge Wayside Park. Those who timed their passing right got to see parts of a building being hoisted high in the air. The work involved workers from Lane County Parks who tore down an old building and constructed a new restroom facility, along with replacing sidewalks at the popular site. The project, in cooperation with the Oregon State Marine Board, was the first phase of improvements to the Hendricks Bridge Wayside. That initial work was part of grant financed improvements fueled by the Oregon State Marine Board with funds provided by boat registrations. The second phase, according to Mike Russell, Parks and Animal Services Division Manager, is hoped to be completed by the end of 2016. It is designed to expand the parking lot and reconfigure the boat ramp into the McKenzie River. The reconfiguration would orient the ramp at more of a downstream angle to help make it a bit more “maintenance friendly,” Russell noted.

Off Beat Oregon History

Drunken husbandBy Finn J.D. John

You may have heard of Henderson Luelling - the Quaker nurseryman who founded an Oregon industry when he brought a wagon full of tiny trees out on the Oregon Trail, back in 1847. His story was recently memorialized in a children’s book that won the “Oregon Reads” award for the state sesquicentennial: “Apples to Oregon,” by Deborah Hopkins.
On the trail to Oregon, many of Luelling’s fellow emigrants thought he was crazy. The care he lavished on the trees (even at the expense of his wife and nine children) was, by anyone’s lights, obsessive. But history vindicated Luelling when the few hundred surviving tree slips made him a wealthy man upon his arrival in the Willamette Valley.

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Doodles By Barry McWilliams

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Gardening Tips

ConiferBy Kym Pokorny
We buy live Christmas trees with the best of intentions, promising ourselves to plant them in the garden as soon as the holidays are over. But resolve has a way of fading like resolutions after January.
Moved outside without the care they need, the beautiful, and not inexpensive, trees meant to go in the ground in winter, languish, fade to brown and eventually die. One alternative is to buy plants meant to stay in pots, said Al Shay, a horticulture instructor at Oregon State University.
“It’s a trade-off,” he said. “You give up big trees for smaller, slower-growing plants that you can bring in year after year. But what’s small? Is four feet too small? Three feet? It’s relative.”

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McKenzie River Reflections is the weekly newspaper serving Oregon's McKenzie River Valley. Available by mail for $23/yr in Lane County, $29/yr outside Lane. Digital subscriptions are $23/yr. Subscribe at: http://mckenzieriverreflectionsnewspaper.com/catalog/subscriptions-0. Purchase copies online at: http://mckenzieriverreflectionsnewspaper.com/catalog/back-issues-0. Read about area communities including Cedar Flat, Walterville, Camp Creek, Leaburg, Vida, Nimrod, Finn Rock, Blue River, Rainbow and McKenzie Bridge.