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Work began on Tuesday

Goose logs

 

 

 

 

 

MCKENZIE BRIDGE: The start of logging at the Goose Timber Sale in the Willamette National Forest north of McKenzie Bridge has generated a response from environmentalists. The Cascadia Forest Defenders (CFD) have maintained a tree sit protest inside the Goose Timber Sale since late May and CFD reported evidence of logging on Tuesday, October 17th.
The group said their tree sit was searched and extensively photographed this Wednesday by Lane County Sherriff’s Deputies and Forest Service Officers with a promise to “see you tomorrow." This is the first contact CFD has had with law enforcement since the tree sit protest began six months ago.

Off Beat Oregon History

High-water mark of Oregon’s postwar-timber-era culture

Pixie kitchen

 

 

 

 

By Finn J.D. John
It goes without saying that Oregon has changed in the 50 years that have gone by since the Tom McCall era.
People who remember Oregon in 1967 look back on a sort of Edenic place, comfortably conservative in some ways and progressive in others; a place with plentiful good-paying jobs and high levels of public services and low taxes and excellent roads, all paid for by a booming timber industry.
It went away, of course, when the mills started mechanizing and the available logging projects dwindled, starting in the mid-1970s. But while it lasted, it was a real and distinctive regional culture.
To get a sense of that culture (or, for those of us who have been here long enough, to remember it), there’s really no better refresher than Pixieland.

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Doodles By Barry McWilliams

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Gardening Tips

Saving seeds

 

 

 

 

 

By Kym Pokorny
As the gardening season winds down and you pick the season’s last vegetables let some plants go to seed and harvest them for planting next year.
“Saving seed can be really fun and is a great way to learn about plants,” said Weston Miller, a horticulturist with Oregon State University Extension Service. “If you choose the right types of vegetables, you can keep them going year after year without buying them again.”
The key to saving seed is selecting open-pollinated or heirloom plants, which produce offspring with the same traits. Hybrids are bred from two different varieties for characteristics like disease resistance or higher yield and won’t come “true to type” in the next generation. Check seed packets or catalog information so that you know which you are buying.
The easiest crops for saving seed are annual plants that self-pollinate like lettuce, beans, peas, peppers, eggplants and tomatoes.

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McKenzie River Reflections is the weekly newspaper serving Oregon's McKenzie River Valley. Available by mail for $23/yr in Lane County, $29/yr outside Lane. Digital subscriptions are $23/yr. Subscribe at: http://mckenzieriverreflectionsnewspaper.com/catalog/subscriptions-0. Purchase copies online at: http://mckenzieriverreflectionsnewspaper.com/catalog/back-issues-0. Read about area communities including Cedar Flat, Walterville, Camp Creek, Leaburg, Vida, Nimrod, Finn Rock, Blue River, Rainbow and McKenzie Bridge.